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The Scrum apocalypse: changing the way we implement Scrum

I love Scrum. There, I said it. Yes, I know I am a married man, and I should not have another love next to my wife, but it is true and I am proud of it: I love Scrum. Every time I read the Scrum guide, I get butterflies in my stomach. It is like that one hot summer back in your teens, experiencing your first summer love. I love it. I may even be addicted to it. Last year, I wrote a blog about the Zombie Scrum apocalypse. I wrote about how we all should fight it. Heal the Scrum zombies and return to the heart and soul of Scrum. And to the butterflies in your stomach.

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The new way of testing

This week, Hozan Said, our new Business Development Manager, talks about his impression of spriteCloud’s working culture.

I joined spriteCloud at the beginning of June and my first impression was really positive. The team wanted to make me feel at home. During the day, the CEO and COO and my new colleagues asked me several times if I was doing well and if I needed anything. It was an amazing environment. What attracted my attention was the mentality: work hard, play hard. Everybody has so much fun together, but they work hard too, so it doesn’t impact the quality of what they do. On the first day, we had lunch together, played table football, and tried out the VR stuff that we are testing. A whole new world was opening up for me! It was amazing to see how much freedom everybody gets, and that there is no hierarchy. They told me from the first day: “Please try new things, don’t be scared. If you fail, you fail and you learn. If you get good results, you will get a nice commission.”

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Standard platform, operating system and browser recommendations (June 17)

This entry is part 12 of 12 in the series Standard Platform, Operating System and Browser Recommendations

Introduction

The following post updates our recommendations for platforms, operating systems and browsers to use when testing commercial web sites targeting consumers in Europe.

Our recommendations are based on usage figures widely available on the Internet, our experience, and our analysis of client needs. Since browser versions change frequently, we review and update these recommendations regularly.

Continue Reading »

Standard platform, operating system and browser recommendations (Feb 17)

This entry is part 11 of 12 in the series Standard Platform, Operating System and Browser Recommendations

Introduction

The following post updates our recommendations for platforms, operating systems and browsers to use when testing commercial web sites targeting consumers in Europe.

Our recommendations are based on usage figures widely available on the Internet, our experience and our analysis of client needs. Since browser versions change frequently, we review and update these recommendations regularly.

Continue Reading »

Standard platform, operating system and browser recommendations (Sept 16)

This entry is part 10 of 12 in the series Standard Platform, Operating System and Browser Recommendations

Introduction

The following post updates our recommendations for platforms, operating systems and browsers to use when testing commercial web sites targeting consumers in Europe.

Our recommendations are based on usage figures widely available on the Internet, our experience and our analysis of client needs. Since browser versions change frequently, we review and update these recommendations regularly.

Continue Reading »

Standard platform, operating system and browser recommendations (June 16)

Introduction

The following post updates our recommendations for platforms, operating systems and browsers to use when testing commercial web sites targeting consumers in Europe.

Our recommendations are based on usage figures widely available on the Internet, our experience and analysis of client needs. Since browser versions change frequently, we review and update these recommendations regularly.

Continue Reading »

Why we test on physical devices

At spriteCloud, we have our own test lab consisting of a broad range of mobile devices to test on. As you can understand, in the current market of mobile phones, it can be difficult to keep a test lab up to date; new phones are released all year round. Updates to operating systems are pretty common. So we always look for tools which can help us testing on as many devices and OS versions as possible. There are quite some solutions to subscribe to, which offer a test lab with physical devices in the cloud. But why do we still maintain our own test lab? What makes it so necessary to test on a physical device which you are holding in your hand, instead of a physical device in the cloud? The last couple of weeks, I have been testing three of those cloud based solutions; browserstack, testingbot and crossbrowsertesting. I’m not going into details on these services. I just want to share one observation and elaborate a bit on that.

Currently, I am testing an ecommerce website for a client. For ecommerce websites, mobile is very important. A lot of traffic comes from mobile devices and tablets. A good responsive website is a must-have for every company active in ecommerce. So for testing, I have a pile of tablets and phones on my desk. Next to that, I’m using browserstack’s physical devices every now and then for debugging, or just because I need one specific device. Today, I discovered a bug on a scrollable menu; in Chrome on Android the scrollable menu … well …, was not scrollable. That’s quite inconvenient for the customer, since all clues indicate the menu is scrollable. Our frontend developer asked me to use browserstack to debug the issue. So we started browserstack, opened the console to check for errors, loaded the page, fastened our seatbelts, and tried to scroll. Tremendous was our surprise when we were able to scroll!

That got me thinking and made me smack my head a bit. Our first guess was that we couldn’t scroll, due to the touch input not being recognized correctly. At first I wanted to know how browserstack connects to their physical devices, since scrolling the menu on a desktop browser worked. My magic google skills did not give me an answer to that question, but I realised that the question was not relevant. No matter how my input is translated to the physical device in their test lab, it is not done by touching the screen with a finger (at least, I hope there are no testing minions in their test lab). This made me come to the conclusion that we always will need to test interactions on our physical devices instead of devices in the cloud. Probably, this is kicking in an open door, but I just forgot about it, since testing with browserstack went pretty well.

Does this mean tools like browserstack have a very limited value? Of course not. It is especially useful for testing different responsive views on a lot of different devices; it even has a special feature for that. But when you test interactions, make sure you always also test on a physical device in your hand. And let’s be honest; it is also pretty cool to be one of the first people to try out new devices and new versions of a mobile OS.

Standard platform, operating system and browser recommendations (February 16)

Introduction

The following post updates our recommendations for platforms, operating systems and browsers to use when testing commercial web sites targeting consumers in Europe.

Our recommendations are based on usage figures widely available on the Internet, our experience and analysis of client needs. Since modern browser versions change frequently, we review and update these recommendations regularly.

Continue Reading »

What is the benefit of Scrum Master certification to a Software Tester?

Recently, I passed the Professional Scrum Master I (PSM I) certification on Scrum.org. Reading the Scrum guide made me wonder: What is the benefit of doing the PSM I certification to a tester? Testers do not have a specified role in a Scrum team, they are just one of the guys/girls developing. But most functional testers like me do not have a lot of development skills. So, how can I be of value to the Scrum Team, apart from just being ‘The tester’?

What have I learned about it?
Starting from the beginning; what did I actually learn about Scrum? The main thing I learned is the shared responsibility between all the team members. Everybody is responsible delivering a releasable increment at the end of the sprint. To make sure this is going to happen, the development team is in the lead in about anything affecting the sprint scope. The Scrum Master and Product owner’s sole role is to help the development team create as much value as possible, by making sure nobody interrupts the team and the requirements are crystal clear.
What did I learn about my role as a tester? I learned that I need to stop thinking in distinct roles. Software Developers, Testers, Designers; we are all in this together. Together we make sure we create a releasable increment. We are all Developers, developing the increment. What Scrum does is breaking down the walls, sometimes existing between the different groups and making them work together as one team, with one goal. Developers can have a specialism, but that does not mean they should only focus on that sole specialism.
So, as a Developer with testing as my specialism, what should I do within the Scrum Team? Testing of course, but besides that, I think my value also lies in communicating with the Product Owner, helping him to refine the requirements. And together with the designers, I can make sure their designs fit the requirements (although it is perfectly valid to call that testing 😉 ).

Is it beneficial to testers to get the PSM I certification?
It is definitely beneficial to get this certification. It is especially beneficial to testers who work in a Scrum team, an agile team or an organization which wants to shift its development process to Scrum. Getting the certification helps you to really get what Scrum is and how it works. Seeing it in action in an organization helps you to see where the major difficulties lie. Based on that, as a tester, you can start to add value to the process and help the team progressing in becoming a more effective team, working towards one goal: building a releasable increment.

What level of tester should take it?
For a tester, it would be beneficial to first have some experience in working in a Scrum team. A substantial amount of the questions in the exam deal with real-life situations. You will recognize the situation more easily if you have worked within a Scrum team. I would recommend to get this certification after +/- 1 year of experience as it will show to potential customers that you have mastered the basics of Scrum and that you will be able to work within a Scrum team.

If it would be up to me, I would say every modern tester should get the PSM I certification. More and more companies are making the switch towards working agile and/or Scrum. To stay relevant as a tester, the PSM I certificate is a must-have.

Standard platform, operating system and browser recommendations (November 15)

Introduction

The following post updates our recommendations for platforms, operating systems and browsers to use when testing commercial web sites targeting consumers in Europe.

Our recommendations are based on usage figures widely available on the Internet, our experience and analysis of client needs. Since modern browser versions change frequently, we review and update these recommendations regularly.

Continue Reading »

Reputation. Meet spriteCloud

Find out today why startups, SMBs, enterprises, brands, digital agencies, e-commerce, and mobile clients turn to spriteCloud to help improve their customer experiences. And their reputation. With complete range of QA services, we provide a full service that includes test planning, functional testing, test automation, performance testing, consultancy, mobile testing, and security testing. We even have a test lab — open to all our clients to use — with a full range of devices and platforms.

Discover how our process can boost your reputation.