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Which Android versions should I test on?

This entry is part 6 of 6 in the series Android

Android statistics chart

In the last Android statistics blog, I made the prediction that Android 7 would really take a larger market share. Obviously that was to be expected. We have seen Android 7 Nougat grow from 7.1% to 13.5% this month. It is not hard to predict that by November, Android Nougat will have reached a solid third place. What is still surprising to see is the slow decline of Android 4.4, losing only 2.8% in the last three months. Android 4.4 is already almost 4 years old, but still holds the third spot in size. So for testing, Android 4.4 still needs to be considered.

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The new way of testing

This week, Hozan Said, our new Business Development Manager, talks about his impression of spriteCloud’s working culture.

I joined spriteCloud at the beginning of June and my first impression was really positive. The team wanted to make me feel at home. During the day, the CEO and COO and my new colleagues asked me several times if I was doing well and if I needed anything. It was an amazing environment. What attracted my attention was the mentality: work hard, play hard. Everybody has so much fun together, but they work hard too, so it doesn’t impact the quality of what they do. On the first day, we had lunch together, played table football, and tried out the VR stuff that we are testing. A whole new world was opening up for me! It was amazing to see how much freedom everybody gets, and that there is no hierarchy. They told me from the first day: “Please try new things, don’t be scared. If you fail, you fail and you learn. If you get good results, you will get a nice commission.”

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Standard platform, operating system and browser recommendations (June 17)

This entry is part 12 of 12 in the series Standard Platform, Operating System and Browser Recommendations

Introduction

The following post updates our recommendations for platforms, operating systems and browsers to use when testing commercial web sites targeting consumers in Europe.

Our recommendations are based on usage figures widely available on the Internet, our experience, and our analysis of client needs. Since browser versions change frequently, we review and update these recommendations regularly.

Continue Reading »

Which Android versions should I test on?

This entry is part 5 of 6 in the series Android

Android statistics chart

It has been an interesting couple of months for Android enthusiasts. The highlight probably has been the release of the Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus. Next to releases of new devices, Android Nougat is being released by manufacturers to more devices. We can see this in the Android statistics for the last three months. Android Nougat has gained a market share of 7.1% compared to the 1.2% it had in February. Together with the growth of Nougat, we can see the stabilization of Android Marshmallow and Lollipop. Kitkat still holds a marketshare of 18.8%, losing only 3.1% over the last three months.

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Which Android versions are most important for testing?

This entry is part 7 of 6 in the series Android


In the last few months Android Nougat (7.0/7.1) has started to gain market share according to the statistics that Google published. From previous new Android versions, we’ve seen that it takes about 6 months to gain more than 5% market share. Another sign of change is that Android 6.0 growth is slowing down. Here you can apply the same rule of thumb that within 6 months, this version will not increase its market share any more, instead the numbers will start to decline instead. And last but not least, Android 5.1 is finally showing a drop in market share.

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Standard platform, operating system and browser recommendations (Feb 17)

This entry is part 11 of 12 in the series Standard Platform, Operating System and Browser Recommendations

Introduction

The following post updates our recommendations for platforms, operating systems and browsers to use when testing commercial web sites targeting consumers in Europe.

Our recommendations are based on usage figures widely available on the Internet, our experience and our analysis of client needs. Since browser versions change frequently, we review and update these recommendations regularly.

Continue Reading »

Standard platform, operating system and browser recommendations (Sept 16)

This entry is part 10 of 12 in the series Standard Platform, Operating System and Browser Recommendations

Introduction

The following post updates our recommendations for platforms, operating systems and browsers to use when testing commercial web sites targeting consumers in Europe.

Our recommendations are based on usage figures widely available on the Internet, our experience and our analysis of client needs. Since browser versions change frequently, we review and update these recommendations regularly.

Continue Reading »

Standard platform, operating system and browser recommendations (June 16)

Introduction

The following post updates our recommendations for platforms, operating systems and browsers to use when testing commercial web sites targeting consumers in Europe.

Our recommendations are based on usage figures widely available on the Internet, our experience and analysis of client needs. Since browser versions change frequently, we review and update these recommendations regularly.

Continue Reading »

Standard platform, operating system and browser recommendations (February 16)

Introduction

The following post updates our recommendations for platforms, operating systems and browsers to use when testing commercial web sites targeting consumers in Europe.

Our recommendations are based on usage figures widely available on the Internet, our experience and analysis of client needs. Since modern browser versions change frequently, we review and update these recommendations regularly.

Continue Reading »

What is the benefit of Scrum Master certification to a Software Tester?

Recently, I passed the Professional Scrum Master I (PSM I) certification on Scrum.org. Reading the Scrum guide made me wonder: What is the benefit of doing the PSM I certification to a tester? Testers do not have a specified role in a Scrum team, they are just one of the guys/girls developing. But most functional testers like me do not have a lot of development skills. So, how can I be of value to the Scrum Team, apart from just being ‘The tester’?

What have I learned about it?
Starting from the beginning; what did I actually learn about Scrum? The main thing I learned is the shared responsibility between all the team members. Everybody is responsible delivering a releasable increment at the end of the sprint. To make sure this is going to happen, the development team is in the lead in about anything affecting the sprint scope. The Scrum Master and Product owner’s sole role is to help the development team create as much value as possible, by making sure nobody interrupts the team and the requirements are crystal clear.
What did I learn about my role as a tester? I learned that I need to stop thinking in distinct roles. Software Developers, Testers, Designers; we are all in this together. Together we make sure we create a releasable increment. We are all Developers, developing the increment. What Scrum does is breaking down the walls, sometimes existing between the different groups and making them work together as one team, with one goal. Developers can have a specialism, but that does not mean they should only focus on that sole specialism.
So, as a Developer with testing as my specialism, what should I do within the Scrum Team? Testing of course, but besides that, I think my value also lies in communicating with the Product Owner, helping him to refine the requirements. And together with the designers, I can make sure their designs fit the requirements (although it is perfectly valid to call that testing 😉 ).

Is it beneficial to testers to get the PSM I certification?
It is definitely beneficial to get this certification. It is especially beneficial to testers who work in a Scrum team, an agile team or an organization which wants to shift its development process to Scrum. Getting the certification helps you to really get what Scrum is and how it works. Seeing it in action in an organization helps you to see where the major difficulties lie. Based on that, as a tester, you can start to add value to the process and help the team progressing in becoming a more effective team, working towards one goal: building a releasable increment.

What level of tester should take it?
For a tester, it would be beneficial to first have some experience in working in a Scrum team. A substantial amount of the questions in the exam deal with real-life situations. You will recognize the situation more easily if you have worked within a Scrum team. I would recommend to get this certification after +/- 1 year of experience as it will show to potential customers that you have mastered the basics of Scrum and that you will be able to work within a Scrum team.

If it would be up to me, I would say every modern tester should get the PSM I certification. More and more companies are making the switch towards working agile and/or Scrum. To stay relevant as a tester, the PSM I certificate is a must-have.

Reputation. Meet spriteCloud

Find out today why startups, SMBs, enterprises, brands, digital agencies, e-commerce, and mobile clients turn to spriteCloud to help improve their customer experiences. And their reputation. With complete range of QA services, we provide a full service that includes test planning, functional testing, test automation, performance testing, consultancy, mobile testing, and security testing. We even have a test lab — open to all our clients to use — with a full range of devices and platforms.

Discover how our process can boost your reputation.