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Which Android versions should I test on?

This entry is part 6 of 6 in the series Android

Android statistics chart

In the last Android statistics blog, I made the prediction that Android 7 would really take a larger market share. Obviously that was to be expected. We have seen Android 7 Nougat grow from 7.1% to 13.5% this month. It is not hard to predict that by November, Android Nougat will have reached a solid third place. What is still surprising to see is the slow decline of Android 4.4, losing only 2.8% in the last three months. Android 4.4 is already almost 4 years old, but still holds the third spot in size. So for testing, Android 4.4 still needs to be considered.

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How to make your cross-browser testing strategy more effective (Part 2)

This is part 2 of this article discussing the reasons why you should test your app or website on multiple browser configurations. Today we continue with browser functionality and the differences between devices.

How your product functions on different browsers

Ideally, the way your product functions would be the same on all browsers and operating systems. However this is often not the case, and is another scenario in testing where the end user experience needs to be taken into account when writing test plans.

The various components that make up a website or application such as HTML, CSS styles, Javascript and page layouts need to be tested across different browsers. The functionality of Javascript and page layouts in particular vary from browser to browser, as they express varying capabilities when implementing different features determined by your developer’s code. Although browser compatibility is becoming standardised, the continued usage of older browsers that are no longer being developed inevitably means that some features of your website will not work properly on every browser. This does not necessarily matter, as long as the core information is available to as many users as possible.

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Standard platform, operating system and browser recommendations (June 17)

This entry is part 12 of 12 in the series Standard Platform, Operating System and Browser Recommendations

Introduction

The following post updates our recommendations for platforms, operating systems and browsers to use when testing commercial web sites targeting consumers in Europe.

Our recommendations are based on usage figures widely available on the Internet, our experience, and our analysis of client needs. Since browser versions change frequently, we review and update these recommendations regularly.

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Standard platform, operating system and browser recommendations (Feb 17)

This entry is part 11 of 12 in the series Standard Platform, Operating System and Browser Recommendations

Introduction

The following post updates our recommendations for platforms, operating systems and browsers to use when testing commercial web sites targeting consumers in Europe.

Our recommendations are based on usage figures widely available on the Internet, our experience and our analysis of client needs. Since browser versions change frequently, we review and update these recommendations regularly.

Continue Reading »

Standard platform, operating system and browser recommendations (Sept 16)

This entry is part 10 of 12 in the series Standard Platform, Operating System and Browser Recommendations

Introduction

The following post updates our recommendations for platforms, operating systems and browsers to use when testing commercial web sites targeting consumers in Europe.

Our recommendations are based on usage figures widely available on the Internet, our experience and our analysis of client needs. Since browser versions change frequently, we review and update these recommendations regularly.

Continue Reading »

Standard platform, operating system and browser recommendations (June 16)

Introduction

The following post updates our recommendations for platforms, operating systems and browsers to use when testing commercial web sites targeting consumers in Europe.

Our recommendations are based on usage figures widely available on the Internet, our experience and analysis of client needs. Since browser versions change frequently, we review and update these recommendations regularly.

Continue Reading »

Why we test on physical devices

At spriteCloud, we have our own test lab consisting of a broad range of mobile devices to test on. As you can understand, in the current market of mobile phones, it can be difficult to keep a test lab up to date; new phones are released all year round. Updates to operating systems are pretty common. So we always look for tools which can help us testing on as many devices and OS versions as possible. There are quite some solutions to subscribe to, which offer a test lab with physical devices in the cloud. But why do we still maintain our own test lab? What makes it so necessary to test on a physical device which you are holding in your hand, instead of a physical device in the cloud? The last couple of weeks, I have been testing three of those cloud based solutions; browserstack, testingbot and crossbrowsertesting. I’m not going into details on these services. I just want to share one observation and elaborate a bit on that.

Currently, I am testing an ecommerce website for a client. For ecommerce websites, mobile is very important. A lot of traffic comes from mobile devices and tablets. A good responsive website is a must-have for every company active in ecommerce. So for testing, I have a pile of tablets and phones on my desk. Next to that, I’m using browserstack’s physical devices every now and then for debugging, or just because I need one specific device. Today, I discovered a bug on a scrollable menu; in Chrome on Android the scrollable menu … well …, was not scrollable. That’s quite inconvenient for the customer, since all clues indicate the menu is scrollable. Our frontend developer asked me to use browserstack to debug the issue. So we started browserstack, opened the console to check for errors, loaded the page, fastened our seatbelts, and tried to scroll. Tremendous was our surprise when we were able to scroll!

That got me thinking and made me smack my head a bit. Our first guess was that we couldn’t scroll, due to the touch input not being recognized correctly. At first I wanted to know how browserstack connects to their physical devices, since scrolling the menu on a desktop browser worked. My magic google skills did not give me an answer to that question, but I realised that the question was not relevant. No matter how my input is translated to the physical device in their test lab, it is not done by touching the screen with a finger (at least, I hope there are no testing minions in their test lab). This made me come to the conclusion that we always will need to test interactions on our physical devices instead of devices in the cloud. Probably, this is kicking in an open door, but I just forgot about it, since testing with browserstack went pretty well.

Does this mean tools like browserstack have a very limited value? Of course not. It is especially useful for testing different responsive views on a lot of different devices; it even has a special feature for that. But when you test interactions, make sure you always also test on a physical device in your hand. And let’s be honest; it is also pretty cool to be one of the first people to try out new devices and new versions of a mobile OS.

Standard platform, operating system and browser recommendations (February 16)

Introduction

The following post updates our recommendations for platforms, operating systems and browsers to use when testing commercial web sites targeting consumers in Europe.

Our recommendations are based on usage figures widely available on the Internet, our experience and analysis of client needs. Since modern browser versions change frequently, we review and update these recommendations regularly.

Continue Reading »

The Cost of Compatibility

Yesterday at spriteCloud, we discussed how Safari is the new IE, meaning that of the major browsers, Safari seems to lag further and further behind in providing an up-to-date Web experience.

Elsewhere, that article turned into a different discussion: does it even matter to end-users if there is one browser that needs to be supported with more effort than any other? Yes it does: we can even calculate how much it matters.

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Reputation. Meet spriteCloud

Find out today why startups, SMBs, enterprises, brands, digital agencies, e-commerce, and mobile clients turn to spriteCloud to help improve their customer experiences. And their reputation. With complete range of QA services, we provide a full service that includes test planning, functional testing, test automation, performance testing, consultancy, mobile testing, and security testing. We even have a test lab — open to all our clients to use — with a full range of devices and platforms.

Discover how our process can boost your reputation.